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Project

Policy intersections: Strengthening bottom up accountability amidst land rush in Mali and Nigeria
 

Mali
Nigeria
Project ID
108696
Total Funding
CAD 506,000.00
IDRC Officer
Ramata Thioune
Project Status
Completed
End Date
Duration
36 months

Programs and partnerships

Governance and Justice

Lead institution(s)

Project leader:
Sofía Monsalve Suárez
Germany

Summary

Over the past few years, large-scale acquisitions (purchases, leases, or other arrangements) of farmland in developing countries by individuals, corporations, and foreign governments have presented both economic opportunities and threats to traditional livelihoods.Read more

Over the past few years, large-scale acquisitions (purchases, leases, or other arrangements) of farmland in developing countries by individuals, corporations, and foreign governments have presented both economic opportunities and threats to traditional livelihoods. This trend has reduced access to key resources, like water and grazing land, upon which small-scale farmers in developing countries depend. Complicating the picture is the patchwork of customary laws, legal frameworks, institutions, and various authorities regulating land ownership and use.

The livelihoods of people are complex, multi-layered, and interconnected, so focusing accountability action on only one field or issue, which is the traditional approach of marginalized rural groups, limits any accountability strategy. This shortcoming is especially pertinent when the intricacies of customary, gender, and generational dynamics are also taken into consideration.

Under the leadership of FIAN-International (Foodfirst Information and Action Network), with the participation of researchers and civil society groups from Mali and Nigeria, this project seeks to establish new accountability strategies that will can address these overlapping legal and institutional contexts. It will also examine the difficulties surrounding women and youth in achieving land and associated resource tenure rights in rural communities that are governed by social and cultural norms that prevent women from exercising their rights.

The researchers will use a participatory action research methodology with a feminist approach. Expected results include development of inclusive accountability strategies and tools that account for women and youth’s perspectives. At the regional level, the project intends to influence the land guidelines that are currently being negotiated to advance customary land rights. It also aims to strengthen strategic alliances through the West African Convergence of Land and Water Struggles to secure community land rights, particularly women’s land rights, in West Africa. This project is part of a group of IDRC-supported projects in sub-Saharan Africa entitled “Using Action Research to Improve Land Rights and Governance for Communities, Women and Vulnerable Groups”.

Research outputs

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Report
Language:

English

Summary

This report summarizes the implementation activities, “policy intersections” and the subsequent production of a draft model Land Use Bill (LUB, 2018) for Nigeria. This study broadly focused on land use intersections to determine appropriate policy for countering the problem of land rush/land concentration within the context of the previous Land Use Act (LUA, 1978). The workshop aimed to strengthen communities’ capacity to proactively engage legislators on the need for policy changes and urge support of the proposed bill for the establishment of Lands Use and Allocation Commission (LUAC) in order to improve community lands ownership.

Author(s)
Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth
Brief
Language:

English

Summary

A new Model Land Use Bill is proposed to address the lapses identified in the Nigerian Land Use Act (LUA, 1978), such as poor administrative system for lands, ownership, and the absence of community participation. This policy brief promotes a new land management structure for ease of business, to improve social and environmental protection, and to reduce land-grabbing by dispossession. The impact of land grabbing is one of many problems of social and environmental degradation, biodiversity loss and livelihoods impacted by deforestation. Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria is a Nigerian advocacy group dedicated to the non-violent defense of the human ecosystem in terms of human rights.

Author(s)
Ojo, Godwin Uyi
Report
Language:

English

Summary

The challenges of having to deal with multiple sectors, institutions (customary and statutory law) and actors are daunting. The report highlights that even amid convoluted customary land tenure arrangements, inclusive collective negotiation is possible. The research aimed to better understand accountability strategies by local people in the context of addressing intersecting resource grabs in Mali and Nigeria, as well as the convolutions surrounding women and youths’ land and resource tenure rights in patriarchal rural communities. Engagement of women and youths in grass root natural resource governance and accountability processes has helped strengthen entitlement to informed participation in the governance of natural resources.

Author(s)
Suárez, Sofía Monsalve
Paper
Language:

English

Summary

The Land Use Bill objective is to guarantee the continued existence of communal and family land in accordance with the culture and tradition of the people of Cross River State/Nigeria in so far as the culture and tradition are in accordance with equity, natural justice and good conscience. The bill proposes to fundamentally reform the land sector, liberalise state control over customary land, increase accessibility to land, and secure land rights for everyone interested in using land for development purposes. This document is a discussion draft of the Bill.

Author(s)
Ojo, Godwin
Article
Language:

English

Summary

Climate change and green grabbing/resource grabbing together call for nuanced understanding of governance imperatives, and for constructing a knowledge base appropriate to political intervention. This paper offers preliminary ways in which interconnections can be seen and understood, and their implications for research and politics explored. It concludes by way of a preliminary discussion of the notion of ‘agrarian climate justice’ as a possible framework for formal governance or political activism relevant to tackling grey area interconnections. “Green grabbing” is resource grabbing in the name of the environment; the paper recognizes politics of climate change as analytically distinct from ‘climate change.’

Author(s)
Franco, Jennifer C.
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