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Project

Increasing Women's Access to Skilled Pregnancy Care in Nigeria (IMCHA)
 

Nigeria
Project ID
108041
Total Funding
CAD 975,000.00
IDRC Officer
Sana Naffa
Project Status
Completed
End Date
Duration
12 months

Programs and partnerships

Lead institution(s)

Summary

Less than one-third of Nigerian women receive skilled care during delivery. This project will aim to reduce maternal and perinatal deaths by improving vulnerable women's access to healthcare services during and after childbirth.

Access to care in NigeriaRead more

Less than one-third of Nigerian women receive skilled care during delivery. This project will aim to reduce maternal and perinatal deaths by improving vulnerable women's access to healthcare services during and after childbirth.

Access to care in Nigeria
In Nigeria, only 65% of women receive antenatal care during pregnancy. In areas of the country with the highest maternal and perinatal death rates, there are stark disparities in access to health care. For example, less than 10% of pregnant women in Sokoto and Kebbi States receive antenatal care and less than 5% have skilled care during delivery.

For the most part, women's reasons for not accessing maternal health services include a lack of money to pay for health services, lack of transportation, perceptions about the negative attitudes of health workers, and lack of permission from husbands and other family members.

Understanding the problem
This project will provide insight into the issue by identifying the supply and demand factors that influence improved access to maternal health care services in Nigeria, particularly for rural women. With this base, the project will develop an implementation plan to expand the work to six geo-political zones in Nigeria. The goal? To strengthen the availability and use of maternal primary health care services by vulnerable women.

Maternal Health
The Innovating for Maternal and Child Health in Africa program is a seven-year $36 million initiative funded by Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Research outputs

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Article
Language:

English

Summary

Pregnant women in rural communities in Nigeria often do not use Primary Health Care Centres. Through focus group discussions, the study found four broad categories of reasons underlying non-use: 1) accessibility factors – poor roads and transportation, long distances, and facility not always open; 2) perceptions relating to poor quality of care, inadequate drugs, abusive care by health providers, long wait times, and inappropriate referrals; 3) costs of services, including inability to pay for services even when costs are not excessive; the introduction of informal payments by staff; and 4) partner support (or lack thereof), and misinterpretation of signs of pregnancy complications.

Author(s)
Ntoimo, Lorretta Favour C.
Article
Language:

English

Summary

The study revealed factors associated with childhood mortality: age, region, residence, education, wealth index, age at first birth and religion of father and mother. Mothers living in rural areas experience a 28% increase in childhood mortality. Tackling the death of children, whether during perinatal, early or late neonatal, childhood or adolescent age is posing a difficult task in Nigeria. The study points to the correlation between improved health education campaigns and improvements in access to primary health care as directly effective in increasing life expectancy and economic wellbeing.

Author(s)
Yaya, Sanni
Article
Language:

English

Summary

This study determines maternal mortality ratios (MMR) and identifies risk factors for maternal deaths in referral health facilities in Nigeria. Results show an MMR of 2,085 per 100,000 live births in hospital facilities. Efforts to reduce MMR requires the improvement of emergency obstetric care; public health education so that women can seek appropriate and immediate evidence-based pregnancy care; the socioeconomic empowerment of women; and the strengthening of the health care system. In the past ten years contraceptive prevalence rates have remained low at 10%; antenatal attendance has remained at 64%, skilled birth attendance of 33% is one of the lowest in sub-Saharan Africa.

Author(s)
Ntoimo, Lorretta F.
Article
Language:

English

Summary

A questionnaire was used to obtain information relating to health providers’ socio-demographic characteristics; respondents’ knowledge and skills in offering specific Emergency Obstetrics Care (EMOC) services (as compared to standard World Health Organization recommendations); and their confidence in transferring the skills to mid-level providers. Findings indicate that knowledge and reported skills in EMOC by health providers was lower than average in referral facilities in Nigeria. Recommendations include in-service training and re-training of health providers along with health policy and programs that address maternal mortality.

Author(s)
OkonofuaI, Friday
Article
Language:

English

Summary

Child mortality under age five is regarded as an indicator of the progress of societal value systems in health care management (or lack thereof). The study showed significant urban-rural differentials in under-5 mortality rates across bio-demographic, socioeconomic and proximate factors. Strengthening maternal and child health (MCH) programmes specifically in rural areas, and improving health care services would help to ensure overall child survival. Disparities in access and utilization of health care services have hampered the target of promoting Universal Health Coverage (UHC), including widespread reduction in childhood mortalities.

Author(s)
Yaya, Sanni
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