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Project

Bridging communities in Cox’s Bazar: mitigating risks and promoting gender, governance and localization of humanitarian responses in COVID-19 era
 

Bangladesh
Project ID
109493
Total Funding
CAD 1,240,300.00
IDRC Officer
Edgard Rodriguez
Project Status
Completed
End Date
Duration
36 months

Programs and partnerships

Governance and Justice

Lead institution(s)

Project leader:
Dr. Sabina Faiz Rashid
Bangladesh

Summary

This project aims to assist policymaking and civic engagement in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, both within refugee communities and between host and refugee communities in Bangladesh.Read more

This project aims to assist policymaking and civic engagement in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, both within refugee communities and between host and refugee communities in Bangladesh. A rapid and longitudinal research study on the safety and security concerns of vulnerable refugee groups will provide evidence that can build tolerance and peace-building initiatives and enhance the psychosocial well-being of refugees and host communities.

The study will emphasize collaboration between refugee communities, host communities, humanitarian actors, and governments. The aim is to co-create new approaches to promote greater localization of humanitarian interventions and use a gender-transformative lens in relation to acutely vulnerable groups. Research findings and recommendations will be shared through meetings and dialogues with government representatives, volunteers, community-based organizations, local non-governmental organizations, and UN agencies using online and offline platforms.

Research outputs

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Report
Language:

English

Summary

The Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals (FDMN) in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar (Bangladesh), are one of the largest refugee populations in the world (860,000 people). This report is based on Phase-1 research which investigates existing knowledge, attitudes and practices of COVID-19 and its impacts on the FDMN community and their adjacent host community. Owing to existing conservative views in both communities, the primary cause of COVID-19 was reported to be religious/act of God. Primary data showed a gap in knowledge regarding COVID-19 vaccines. The study provides details of major economic, social, and health impacts, exacerbated by pre-existing vulnerabilities.

Author(s)
BRAC James P Grant School of Public Health, BRAC University
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